Conferences and Courses

CONFERENCES

The Society of the Study of Childhood in the Past (SSCIP) annual conferences (http://www.sscip.org.uk/)

PANELS AT CONFERENCES

Panel: Tracing Childhood: Bioarchaeological Investigations of Early Lives in Antiquity

AAA Annual Meeting Montreal, QC, Canada November 16-20, 2011

Organizers:
Dr. Jennifer L. Thompson, Department of Anthropology, University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Dr. Marta Alfonso-Durruty, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania
John J. Crandall, Department of Anthropology, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Panel Abstract:

Studies of prehistoric children are gaining prominence within the academy as scholars continually engage in defining, exploring, and tracing the experiences, contributions, and meaning of children’s lives in the ancient past (e.g. Camp 2009; Lewis 2007; Park 2005; Perry 2006; Sofaer 2000). Reconstituting what it means to be a child, what children contribute to society, and how childhood is constructed are topics to which bioarchaeology can make significant contributions (Halcrow & Tayles 2011). Traditionally, however, bioarchaeological studies have limited their interest to the morbidity and mortality of children in specific populations and have portrayed children as being subject to social forces over which they have no control (e.g. Buckley 2000; Goodman and Armelagos 1989; Humphrey 2003; Lewis 2002, 2010; Mays 1999; Molleson and Cox 1993; Ortner and Mays 1998; Ribot and Roberts 1996; Saunders 2000; Saunders et al. 1995; Steckel and Rose 2002). To broaden our understanding of childhood in prehistory, this session will explore children and childhood from perspectives that emphasize not only their social and ecological environment but also the agency of children. In this session, we aim to explore how children and childhood are now being studied, reformulated, and contextualized within bioarchaeological research.

Papers and participants include:


Tracing Hunter-Gatherer Childhoods In Prehistory: Insights From Punta Teatinos, Chile
Marta Pilar Alfonso Durruty (University of Pennsylvania) and Jennifer L Thompson PhD (University of Nevada, Las Vegas)

Tracing Tiwanaku Childhoods: A Bioarchaeological Study of Age and Identity In Tiwanaku Society
Deborah E Blom (University of Vermont) and Kelly J Knudson (Arizona State University)

Beyond Victims: Exploring the Meaning of Sacrificed Infants At La Cueva De Los Muertos Chiquitos, Durango, Mexico (600-1400 AD)
John J Crandall (University of Nevada, Las Vegas), Jennifer L Thompson PhD (University of Nevada, Las Vegas) and Debra L Martin (University of Nevada, Las Vegas)

The “other” Burials At Torre De Palma: Childhood As Special Death In a Medieval Portuguese Site
Sarah Holt (Ohio State University), Stacey Hallman (University of Western Ontario), Mary Powell (University of Kentucky) and Maia Langley (Museu Nacional de Arqueologia)

Child Health In Medieval England: The Story So Far
Mary Elizabeth Lewis (University of Reading)

Twins in Prehistoric Mainland Southeast Asia: Birth, Death and Personhood
Sian Halcrow (University of Otago), Nancy Tayles (University of Otago), Raelene Inglis (Independent Researcher) and Charles Higham (University of Otago)

A Disciplined Childhood: A Social Bioarchaeology of the Subadults of the Spring Street Presbyterian Church
Meredith A.B. Ellis (Syracuse University)

 


Panel for the 2013 meeting of the International Union of Anthropological and Ethnological Sciences (IUAES):

The Vulnerable Child: biological responses to life in the past


Abstract:

Although the health of infants and children is a sensitive barometer of population health, they were often discounted in archaeological research. There was a perception that their bones do not survive well in the ground, and that they are consistently under-represented in the archaeological record. In recent years attitudes have begun to change and this session aims to explore the current status of the bioarchaeology of children. Child skeletons provide a wealth of information on their physical and social life, from their growth and development, diet and age at death, to the cultural and economic factors that affect their nutrition and expose them to trauma and disease at different stages of their lives. The ways in which children are buried are also very indicative of cultural aspects of a society, including social age and gender structures. Papers within this session explore aspects of infant and child bioarchaeology with the aim to increase awareness of the importance of examining these remains from sites all over the world, and some of the challenges that are faced.

Panel Organisers:

Siân E. Halcrow (sian.halcrow@otago.ac.nz ) and Mary E. Lewis
(m.e.lewis@reading.ac.uk )

If you would like to be part of this panel please send your abstract to the organizers by January 2012.

Please see the following website for further details: http://www.iuaes2013.org/

PAST CONFERENCES

 

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COURSES

University of Dundee Juvenile Osteology course link

 

To advertise your upcoming courses and conferences here, please email sian halcrow (sian.halcrow@otago.ac.nz )

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