Committee Members

President: Mary E. Lewis

Mary (BA Leicester; MSc Bradford; PhD Bradford) is Senior Lecturer in Biological Anthropology in the Department of Archaeology, University of Reading. She specialises in non-adult skeletal pathology in relation to socio-economic transitions in the past. Mary’s recent publications include The Bioarchaeology of Children (CUP, 2007), and criteria for the diagnosis of leprosy (2002), tuberculosis (2011), thalassaemia (2011) and trauma (forthcoming) in non-adult remains. In 2009, Mary completed research into Diaspora in Romano-British communities (AHRC funded) and explored the impact of migration on the health of children living in Poundbury Camp, Dorset. Mary is currently exploring the health of medieval adolescents from England (Leverhulme Trust funded), and is also compiling archaeological evidence for child disease in countries from across the world.

http://www.reading.ac.uk/archaeology/research/Projects/arch-ML-adolescence-medieval-england.aspx

http://reading.academia.edu/MaryLewis

 

Vice-President and Secretary: Siân E. Halcrow

Siân (BA (Hons) and PhD, Otago) is a Lecturer in Biological Anthropology in the Department of Anatomy, University of Otago. She has research expertise in infant and child health and disease in the past in Southeast Asia and an interest in the study of social aspects of childhood using bioarchaeological methods. Siân is currently working on her Marsden funded project on health and social change in Southeast Asia with the intensification of rice agriculture, using the infant and child sample from the site of Ban Non Wat in Northeast Thailand. She also has active bioarchaeologucal research projects from other archaeological sites in Thailand and Cambodia. Siân has published on the bioarchaeology of childhood, infant mortality, infant and child dental ageing, deciduous dental anthropology, and archaeological legislation surrounding the excavation and analysis of human remains in New Zealand and Thailand.

http://anatomy.otago.ac.nz/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=234&Itemid=46

http://otago.academia.edu/SianHalcrow

 

Publicity Officer: Fiona Shapland

Fiona (BA and MSc UCL; PhD Bradford) is a Research Fellow in the Department of Archaeology, University of Reading. She is currently working on the Leverhulme-funded project ‘Adolescence, Health and Migration in Medieval England: the osteological evidence’, for which she will be examining the adolescent human remains from major medieval cemetery sites. Fiona has a particular interest in combining analysis of osteological and mortuary evidence, which is reflected in both the current project and in her PhD research on the treatment of the dead in Iron Age Atlantic Scotland, which she completed at the University of Bradford in late 2010. Aspects of this research have been published in British Archaeology (2010) and several further articles are in press. Fiona also published the results of her Masters research into syphilis and mercury treatment in post-medieval London (2007).

http://www.reading.ac.uk/archaeology/research/Projects/arch-ML-adolescence-medieval-england.aspx

 

Student Representatives:

Europe: Petra Verlinden

Petra first studied archaeology at the University of Leuven (BA and MA). More recently she completed an MSc in Human Osteology and Funerary Archaeology at the University of Sheffield. She became interested in the bioarchaeology of children while studying archaeology in Leuven. During her studies, she has explored both archaeological and osteological literature about children. She has written a paper and a dissertation on the interpretation of child burials, and a dissertation which explores sexual dimorphism in juvenile skeletons. As a result, she is familiar with the problems and recurring themes in this field of study. Petra will be starting a PhD at the University of Reading in October, exploring the occurrence and nature of trauma in medieval adolescents from England (funded by the Leverhulme Trust).

http://www.reading.ac.uk/archaeology/research/Projects/arch-ML-adolescence-medieval-england.aspx

 

All non-European countries: Stephanie Shkrum

Stephanie (MA, Western Ontario) is a PhD student at the University of Otago examining the relationship between the intensification of rice agriculture and oral health in a skeletal collection from Southeast Asia. Developmental enamel defects are included in this investigation as evidence of childhood stress. Her Master's thesis examined child oral health in Romano-Byzantine period Egypt. She is currently preparing papers on aspects of childhood health from her thesis for publication.

Conference/workshop Organisers:  Siân E. Halcrow and Mary E. Lewis

Search

  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
Previous Next
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
  • image
Previous Next